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Battle and the Great Wood

There are currently 1 comments and 4 photos online for this walk.

Battle and the Great Wood
Author: Claire, Published: 08 Sep 2012 Walk rating : Rating:star1 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide star1 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide star1 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide star1 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide star0 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide
East Sussex, Battle
Walk Type: Woodland
Battle and the Great Wood
Length: 5 miles,  Difficulty: boot Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide boot Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide boot Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide
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A 5 mile circular trail from the railway station of Battle in East Sussex. The town gets its name from the Battle of Hastings which was fought between Harold the Saxon King and William the Conqueror in 1066. The battle was so significant it changed the course of English history. The walk heads out from the station to pass through a long section of the Great Wood, a coniferous plantation managed by the Forestry Commission, before heading back into the centre of the town where you have the opportunity to explore some of the historic sites including the abbey which was built by William to mark the site of his victory.

The walk has several long and steady climbs and descents throughout and the paths are a mixture of roadside pavements and mud field/forest paths, the latter of which can be both overgrown and muddy so long trousers and sturdy footwear are recommended. There are no stiles and just a couple of kissing gates. There are public toilets available at the station at the start of the walk. Entrance fees apply for entrance to the abbey. Approximate time 2 to 3 hours plus extra time if you wish to explore the abbey in full.

The walk starts and ends at Battle Railway Station on Station Approach in Battle, East Sussex. The station has a large pay and display car park alongside it. Approximate post code TN33 0DE.

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Walk Sections

Start to Harrier Lane
Start to Harrier Lane

Start point: 50.9129 lat, 0.4947 long
End point: 50.914 lat, 0.4995 long

From Battle Railway Station, head along Station Approach to reach the T-junction with the main road. Turn left to follow the pavement and continue as it heads steadily uphill. Immediately after passing the petrol station on the right, turn left into St Marys Villas. Follow the tarmac bollarded road as it swings right passing a number of properties on the right.

At the fork keep right into Kingsdale Close. At the end of the cul-de-sac follow the narrow footpath to the left of the houses in front of you, passing between a tall hedge on the left and a lower fence on the right. Follow the narrow paved path as it swings left to reach the corner of an open grass field.

Take the right hand path running along the top of the field. As you meet a junction with a slightly wider grass path, take this path left heading downhill. Follow the path as it swings to the right to reach the bottom corner of the field where it emerges out onto Harrier Lane.

Harrier Lane to Great Wood
Harrier Lane to Great Wood

Start point: 50.914 lat, 0.4995 long
End point: 50.9137 lat, 0.5054 long

Turn right along the edge of the road for just 200 yards and, just before the tarmac pavement begins, you will see a footpath signpost on the right hand side. Turn right on the footpath and a few paces in keep left at the fork on the narrow mud footpath through the scrubland. Cross over the stream via the narrow sleeper bridge and continue ahead as the path swings uphill.

Keep left again at the next fork and go ahead through a slight clearing where the path is less well defined. Go up the short slope the opposite side and follow the now obvious path swinging left. The path continues through an arch of rhododendron bushes and then emerges out to reach the coniferous plantation of the Great Wood.

Great Wood to 1066 Country Path
Great Wood to 1066 Country Path

Start point: 50.9137 lat, 0.5054 long
End point: 50.9155 lat, 0.5224 long

As you enter the wood, turn immediately right and join the wide grass track ahead. As you reach a junction with the main stone track, cross over (diagonally right) to continue on the wide grass and stone track. Follow the path as it bends gradually left and after some distance another path will merge in from the right. A few hundred yards further, at the brow of the hill, turn right.

At the T-junction turn left and this path will emerge to a staggered junction of paths. Turn left here, heading uphill onto the path which forms part of the 1066 Country Walk.

1066 Country Path to Marley Lane
1066 Country Path to Marley Lane

Start point: 50.9155 lat, 0.5224 long
End point: 50.9161 lat, 0.5036 long

Follow the 1066 Country Path, a wide forest track, ahead for some distance ignoring any paths off to the left and right.

The 1066 Country Walk is a 31 mile long distance path which commemorates the Battle of Hastings. It runs from Pevensey, where William the Conqueror landed his invading army of Norman troops, and continues up through Battle where King Harold and his troops were defeated and on to Rye. This section of the path runs through the heart of Battle Great Wood, 200 acres of coniferous woodland managed by the Forestry Commission.

The path dwindles to a narrower mud track with a stream running to the right and a fence to the left. Continue ahead and you will emerge to reach a T-junction with Marley Lane.

Marley Lane to Kissing Gate
Marley Lane to Kissing Gate

Start point: 50.9161 lat, 0.5036 long
End point: 50.9146 lat, 0.4906 long

Turn left onto the grass verge running alongside Marley Lane, taking care of the traffic. On the left you will pass Blackfriars Oast, a property with a pair of oast chimneys, typical of the East Sussex and Kent area. After passing Harrier Lane on the left, cross over the road to join the tarmac pavement on the opposite side and continue following Marley Lane towards the centre of Battle.

Cross over the level crossing with care. Further along on the right you will pass the Battle and Langton old school house built originally in 1840 with an ornate facade and now converted to private houses.

At the end of Marley Lane you will come to a mini-roundabout with a kissing gate on the right marked to Malfosse Walk.

Kissing Gate to Mount Street
Kissing Gate to Mount Street

Start point: 50.9146 lat, 0.4906 long
End point: 50.9184 lat, 0.4848 long

Turn right through the kissing gate to follow Malfosse Walk heading downhill. Follow the field edge path down and to the right. At the bottom cross the long footbridge to the left and then continue across a narrow sleeper bridge a few paces later. Continue straight ahead across the middle of the next field, passing to the right of the large tree in its centre. A few paces later take the right hand fork on the lower path.

Cross over the next footbridge in the base of the valley and go straight ahead across the next field. You will emerge through a metal kissing gate onto a quiet tarmac lane. Turn left and follow the lane uphill passing under a tunnel of old oak and beech trees. Continue past the playing fields on the left and then going between houses to reach the T-junction with Mount Street.

Mount Street to Battle Abbey
Mount Street to Battle Abbey

Start point: 50.9184 lat, 0.4848 long
End point: 50.9152 lat, 0.4859 long

Turn left along Mount Street, passing Battle Baptist Church which dates from 1820, on the right. Turn left into Old Ladies Court, passing through a courtyard of shops and then follow the courtyard to the right to reach the High Street. Turn left along the High Street.

Continue down Battle High Street enjoying the wide array of shops, restaurants and pubs many of which are set in Georgian buildings dating from the 1700s. Immediately after Barclays Bank on the left, look up above the alleyway to see the wrought iron arch of ‘Newbery Preserves’ marking the site of a former jam factory.

After seeing the arch, cross over to the right hand side of the High Street and continue further along the road to reach the gatehouse of Battle Abbey ahead.

Battle Abbey to End
Battle Abbey to End

Start point: 50.9152 lat, 0.4859 long
End point: 50.9121 lat, 0.4931 long

The town of Battle grew up around the abbey which was built by William the Conqueror after the Battle of Hastings out of gratitude for the victory and as a monument to the thousands that died on 14 October 1066. The abbey was built between 1070 and 1094 and the high alter was placed on the point that King Harold is thought to have lost his life. Today the abbey ruins and battle grounds are managed by English Heritage (entrance fees apply). From the street the impressive abbey gatehouse, added in 1338, can be enjoyed. Take time to enter and explore the abbey site should you wish.

When you are ready to continue on the walk, pass to the left of the abbey gatehouse continuing down the High Street on the raised walkway with the abbey walls directly to the right. Pass by the Church of St Mary the Virgin on the left hand side.

At the mini-roundabout keep right passing the Chequers pub on the right. A little further along, cross to the left hand side of the road using the zebra crossing. Go straight ahead at the next mini-roundabout and you’ll notice that the road to the right is called Powder Mill Lane, taking its name from the local gunpowder mills.

The first gunpowder mill in Battle was built in 1676 and the town became the centre for the industry in the 1700s. The licences for the milling were withdrawn in 1847 following many accidents, including one in 1798 where 15 tonnes of gunpowder exploded in an oven.

Just a few paces after the mini-roundabout, turn left into Station Approach and follow this to the rail station and car park where your walk began.

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network Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide Original GPX source file

Text and images for this walk are Copyright © 2012 by the author clairesharpuk and may not be reproduced without permission.


1 comments for "Battle and the Great Wood"

A good walk but it was very very muddy in places - but then in is February and it had been raining for a good week before! would definitely do it again.

By nikirichards on 06 Feb 2017

The information in this guide has been provided in good faith and is intended only as a guide, not a statement of fact. You are advised to check the accuracy of the information provided and should not use this guide for navigational directions nor should you rely on the accuracy of the weather forecast. You are advised to take appropriate clothing, footwear, equipment and navigational materials with you according to the current and possible weather and nature of the terrain. Always follow the country code and follow any additional warnings or instructions that may be available. Some walks may be very strenuous and you are advised to seek medical advice if you have any doubts as to your capability to complete the walk.

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4 gallery images for "Battle and the Great Wood"

1328_0clairesharpuk1347136236 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide Image by: Claire
Uploaded: 08 Sep 2012
The Battle Abbey - September 2012
1328_1clairesharpuk1347136236 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide Image by: Claire
Uploaded: 08 Sep 2012
Looking through the town to the Abbey - September 2012
1328_0louad1427573915 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide Image by: louad
Uploaded: 28 Mar 2015
IMG_2342.JPG
1328_0louad1427574155 Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide Image by: louad
Uploaded: 28 Mar 2015
IMG_2435.JPG

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