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Sussex Hospices Trail Part 2: Barnham to Arundel

There are currently 2 comments and 12 photos online for this walk.

Sussex Hospices Trail Part 2: Barnham to Arundel
Author: FSH, Published: 02 Jun 2015 Walk rating : Rating:star1 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UKstar1 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UKstar1 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UKstar1 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UKstar0 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK
West Sussex, Barnham
Walk Type: Long distance path
Sussex Hospices Trail Part 2: Barnham to Arundel
Length: 6 miles,  Difficulty: boot iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK boot iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK
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A 6 mile linear walk from Barnham rail station to Arundel rail station in West Sussex, forming the second stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. The route heads north across flower farms and arable fields to reach Walberton, home of The Sussex Snowdrop Trust, before continuing through woodland and arable fields to reach Arundel where you will have chance to explore the cathedral and castle. You will enjoy a charming village, enchanting woodlands and a lovely stretch of the River Arun along the way. The return leg can be completed with a single 10 minute train journey.

The hospices of Sussex are dedicated to providing specialist end-of-life care. Friends of Sussex Hospices has worked with partners and supporters to create the Sussex Hospices Trail, a 200 mile long-distance path to support and raise awareness of the twelve hospice care providers that serve the adults and children of Sussex.

The walking route from Barnham to Arundel has just gentle slopes for the most part, plus one steeper climb within Arundel. The paths across farmland and through woodland can be very muddy at times so stout boots are recommended (or wellingtons with grips in the wet winter months). There are a few road crossings that need care and one stretch of the route also crosses a golf course so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and look out for any stray flying golf balls. You will need to negotiate some steps and several kissing gates (some of which are tight so be prepared to breathe in!) but there are no stiles on route. Toilets are available at the rail stations at each end and if you are looking for refreshments there are several shops and pubs in Barnham, Walberton and Arundel. Allow 3 hours.

The walk starts at Barnham rail station and ends at Arundel rail station. The two stations are connected by a fairly regular train service and the journey takes just 10 minutes. If you are coming by car, there are pay and display car parks alongside both stations. The daily rate for parking at Barnham is £5 Mon-Sat and £2 Sun and Bank Holidays (correct Jun 2015). Approximate post code for Barnham Station PO22 0ES.

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Walk Sections

Start to Nursery
Start to Nursery

Start point: 50.8312 lat, -0.64 long
End point: 50.8371 lat, -0.6251 long

Standing on Barnham Road with your back to the rail station, turn left for just a few paces to reach the pedestrian crossing. Cross the road and turn right along the pavement, passing Barnham Station now across to your right. (NOTE: If you are continuing your walk from Trail Part 1, pick up the directions from this point). Stay on this left-hand pavement as it bears left along Lake Lane. As soon as it is safe to do so, swap to the right-hand pavement. Immediately after passing the village stores, fork right to continue along Lake Lane, signed to Yapton.

Continue along the lane, passing between properties, for about half a mile. (You will need to swap sides of the road a few times to stay on the pavement). As you draw level with the entrance for Pollards Nursery on the right, turn left into the small tarmac lane, Park Road (signed as a public footpath). Follow this quiet residential lane and at the end you will come to a metal gate ahead.

Pass through the small metal gate and you will come to a junction with a tarmac access lane. Cross over the lane and walk directly ahead to join the signed footpath which leads you across the grass and then along the right-hand edge of the large greenhouses. These glass houses form part of a nursery raising a wide variety of garden plants and flowers.

Nursery to Sussex Snowdrop Trust
Nursery to Sussex Snowdrop Trust

Start point: 50.8371 lat, -0.6251 long
End point: 50.8459 lat, -0.6221 long

Beyond the last greenhouse, pass through the staggered barrier to reach the edge of a large crop field. Follow the obvious wide grass path across the centre of this. Just to the right (at about 1 o’clock) you will see the white mansion building of Walberton Park...more of that later. At the end of the field, go through the kissing gate and you will see a fingerpost marking a crossroads of paths. Walk at about 11 o’clock on the path between fenced paddocks (NOTE: beware of the electric fencing) with Walberton Church visible across the paddock to the right.

At the end of the paddocks, go through the kissing gate and keep ahead on the path passing a property on the left. At the T-junction with the access lane, turn right and you will reach an area of housing at the edge of Walberton village. Stay on the main road as it bears steadily right (ignoring Pound Road on the left).

At the top of the lane you will come to a T-junction with the main street in Walberton. Turn right, passing the pretty thatched Pear Tree Cottage on the left and the Baptist church and garage on the right. Soon afterwards you will find William Booker Yard on the right, home to The Sussex Snowdrop Trust.

The Sussex Snowdrop Trust is a unique charity providing care at home for children that have life-threatening or terminal illnesses. Fundraising for the charity is incredibly important as more than £300,000 is spent each year on direct family care including nurses, counsellors and urgent financial help for parents.

Sussex Snowdrop Trust to St Mary's Church
Sussex Snowdrop Trust to St Mary's Church

Start point: 50.8459 lat, -0.6221 long
End point: 50.8455 lat, -0.6058 long

Continue along the main village street passing various pretty brick and flint properties and the village pub. Stay on the main road as it passes the parade of village shops on the left and then the tall brick and flint boundary wall for Walberton House and Park on the right.

The manor of Walberton has passed through many different families since the 1500s. The old house was replaced in 1818 with a design by Sir Robert Smirke who designed the British Museum. The large formal gardens included walled kitchen gardens, a cucumber house, a mushroom house, stables and a vinery. In the 1950s the house was bought by Frederick Marquis, 1st Earl of Woolton. During World War II Marquis had been Minister for Food and encouraged people to eat a Savoy Hotel vegetable pie recipe to help preserve the meat rations. This became known as the Lord Woolton Pie. The property has since been converted into apartments.

Continue all the way to the end of the road where you will find a mini-roundabout. NOTE: Take extreme care for the last short stretch, where you will need to join the left-hand pavement to avoid traffic coming round the corner. Look ahead and you will see a small metal railing which marks the continuation of your footpath. The safest way to reach this is to use the crossing islands (first right and then left) to reach the far pavement. Take the narrow footpath behind the railing and you will emerge to the corner of a crop field.

Walk directly ahead along the wide grass path with a crop field on the right and a hedgerow on the left. At the end of the field, go through the (tight!) kissing gate ahead. NOTE: This next stretch crosses a golf course so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and look out for any stray flying golf balls. Walk straight ahead to join the path through the tunnel of trees and follow this steadily downhill, swinging left and then right to cross a footbridge over a stream.

Continue on the stone track heading steadily uphill and, just before it swings left and peters out into the golf course, turn right up the slope to join a path with a fenced section of rough ground on the right. The path leads you along the left-hand edge of St Mary’s Church and out through a kissing gate to a quiet lane. In front of St Mary’s Church you will find a handy bench should you wish to stop for refreshments at this point.

St Mary's Church to Tortington Common
St Mary's Church to Tortington Common

Start point: 50.8455 lat, -0.6058 long
End point: 50.8471 lat, -0.5899 long

Standing with your back to the church, cross over the lane and go ahead to join the stone and grass track with a pretty brick and flint wall running on the right. At the end of the track you will come to a signed crossroads of paths. Go directly ahead on the grass track with a hedgerow on the right and an open crop field on the left. At the end of the field, the track bears right leading you through a narrow belt of trees to reach another open field.

Turn left and follow the left-hand boundary round to the far corner where you will find a footpath fingerpost. Go ahead along the footpath into woodland, Binsted Wood. (This section can get quite muddy). Simply stay on the main wide path, ignoring any smaller paths off to the sides. This will lead you to a signed crossroads of paths.

Keep straight ahead, follow the path over a small stream and out to a junction with a stone access track. Turn left for just a few paces and then turn right to join the wide dirt track into the next stretch of woodland, Tortington Common.

Tortington Common to River Arun
Tortington Common to River Arun

Start point: 50.8471 lat, -0.5899 long
End point: 50.8512 lat, -0.5614 long

Follow the wide track with a beautiful woven fence running on the left. This section is awash with a wide array of wild flowers in the spring. Keep your eyes peeled for deer and listen out for the sound of woodpeckers. The track can get very muddy at times but there are plenty of small diversionary paths to the side so that you can avoid the worst of it.

Where the woven fence ends, you will come to a signed junction of paths. Go straight ahead to continue your woodland journey, now passing between enchanting coppiced hazels. Cross the wooden footbridge and continue directly ahead. Eventually you will emerge to a crossroads with a quiet lane. Go ahead, passing alongside a metal gate, to continue on the woodland path.

The path winds through the woods and then emerges to a crossroads with another tarmac lane. Again go straight ahead, passing alongside a disused stile, following the signed footpath through the belt of trees. You will emerge out to the corner of a residential road on the outskirts of Arundel. Cross over and turn right along the pavement. Follow the quiet road all the way to the end where you will reach a junction with a large oak tree in the centre.

Keep straight ahead on this next stretch of leafy street, an avenue lined with lime trees. Soon you will have your first view of Arundel Castle and Cathedral ahead (you will see these landmarks up close later in the walk). Towards the bottom of the slope, turn right into Kirdford Road and follow it to the T-junction. Cross over with care (NOTE: this can be a busy road so take your time) and turn left along the pavement. Just beyond the cemetery and its lodge on the left, turn right down the tarmac track (signed as a public footpath). At the end of the track you will meet the River Arun ahead.

River Arun to Arundel Castle
River Arun to Arundel Castle

Start point: 50.8512 lat, -0.5614 long
End point: 50.8556 lat, -0.5556 long

Turn left along the riverside path with the river running on the right. The path leads you under the A27 road bridge. Stay on the riverside path and soon you are forced to swing left into a residential road. Turn right along the pavement and at the junction, go straight ahead (passing between no vehicle entry signs and passing Newburgh House on the right).

At the next junction, turn right for a few paces and then cross over to turn left into King Street (using the raised walkway along the left-hand side). Follow King Street all the way up to the top where you will find the west facade of Arundel Cathedral on the right.

The Roman Catholic cathedral was completed in 1873 and is faced with Bath stone, built in the French gothic style. The west facade, which you are alongside now, has striking figures of Christ and his apostles and a statue of Mary with her divine child, together with a large rose window adorned with stained glass.

Turn right at the T-junction and follow the pavement past the cathedral on the right and then the 14th century historic church and Arundel Priory on the left. You will come to a road junction ahead; you need to cross the road to join the left-hand pavement here (take particular care). Follow the road as it swing steadily right, passing in front of the gatehouse for the castle on the left.

Arundel Castle began life as a motte and bailey castle built for Roger de Montgomery, a cousin of William the Conqueror. The oldest remaining part of the building is the gatehouse which dates from 1070. The castle has been the seat of the Dukes of Norfolk and their ancestors for more than 850 years. Between the 1870s and 1890s the house was almost completely rebuilt and the magnificent architecture in Gothic style is considered to be one of the great works of Victorian England.

Arundel Castle to End
Arundel Castle to End

Start point: 50.8556 lat, -0.5556 long
End point: 50.8484 lat, -0.5466 long

Follow the pavement downhill towards the centre of Arundel. Pass the war memorial on the right and continue on the left-hand pavement to reach the small roundabout by the river bridge. Cross over with care and go ahead across the river. Immediately before the first house on the left, turn left down the concrete track (signed as a public footpath).

Pass the double garage on the right and then turn left up the narrow footpath between fences which soon becomes a riverside path. Continue with the river on the left and the fenced grounds of the lido on the right.

At a length of 37 miles, the River Arun is the longest river in West Sussex. It rises as a series of small springs to the east of Horsham before merging with the River Rother and finally flowing out to the sea at Littlehampton. This section of the river is tidal and its tidal range and geography make it one of the fastest flowing rivers in England. Local people once caught and ate an abundance of mullet, carried up the river by the strong tides, and mullet remains a nickname given to someone born in Arundel. The traditional dish of Arundel Mullet is served with a sauce made from anchovies, lemon, red wine, herbs and spices.

Just before the river begins to swing hard left, you will come to a waymarker post with yellow arrows, marking a junction of footpaths. If you are continuing onto Trail Part 3, go straight ahead here. Otherwise, turn right here and follow the path out to a T-junction with the road. Turn left along the pavement and at the roundabout keep left (signed to Arundel Station). Use the pedestrian crossing to swap to the right-hand pavement and this will lead you into Arundel Station, marking the end of part two of the Sussex Hospices Trail.

We hope you have enjoyed walking this stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. Its creation was possible thanks to the kind donation from Mrs Gaye Allen, in loving memory of Dr David Allen.

Hospices deliver their services for free but such care is not cheap and they largely depend on funds raised from their local communities. We would be very grateful if you would consider making a donation either to your local hospice, wherever that may be, or to the Friends of Sussex Hospices in order to support these invaluable services.

To donate £5 to the Friends of Sussex Hospices text SHTR16 £5 to 70070. Tap the Listen button below (App only) to hear Kathy Gore, Chair of Friends of Sussex Hospices, explaining why donations are so important.

Friends of Sussex Hospices, Registered Charity No. 1089306
http://www.friendsofsussexhospices.org.uk/how-you-can-help/donations

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Text and images for this walk are Copyright © 2015 by the author FSH and may not be reproduced without permission.


2 responses to "Sussex Hospices Trail Part 2: Barnham to Arundel"

We were astonished by the interest and variety in this lovely walk. The quiet pleasures of this area south of the busy A27 was previously unknown to us. The walk was so well crafted -it had such variety and good stops in the pub in Walberton and in one of many tea shops in Arundel made it even better!

By korman on 2015-06-17 21:18:54

Enjoying the walk, misses a step after passing Newburgh house, turn right up the road towards castle and then left down the high street.

ADMIN RESPONSE: We have just double-checked the directions and they are correct. From Newburgh House you continue uphill to reach the cathedral, then right towards the castle and then right (downhill) on the High Street. Remember to use the live GPS map on the App to help if you are struggling to follow the written directions at any point.

By suzportway on 2016-07-24 13:15:43

The information in this guide has been provided in good faith and is intended only as a guide, not a statement of fact. You are advised to check the accuracy of the information provided and should not use this guide for navigational directions nor should you rely on the accuracy of the weather forecast. You are advised to take appropriate clothing, footwear, equipment and navigational materials with you according to the current and possible weather and nature of the terrain. Always follow the country code and follow any additional warnings or instructions that may be available. Some walks may be very strenuous and you are advised to seek medical advice if you have any doubts as to your capability to complete the walk.

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12 images to "Sussex Hospices Trail Part 2: Barnham to Arundel"

4551_0Richard1433312205 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
The offices of the Sussex Snowdrop Trust.
4551_1Richard1433312205 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
St Mary's church from the golf course.
4551_2Richard1433312205 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
Richard and Bobbie having some refreshments about half way round at St Mary's Church. We'd love you to add your picture taken at this handy bench when you walk the trail.
4551_3Richard1433312205 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
If you look closely you will see a deer on the path in the distance. This is the view as you enter Tortington Common. Taken in June 2015.
4551_4Richard1433312205 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
We were lucky enough to see these swans with seven cygnets on the River Arun.
4551_0Richard1433312551 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
Gate house of Arundel Castle.
4551_1Richard1433312551 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
As you walk along the second stretch of the River Arun don't forget to look back to see a splendid view of Arundel Castle
4551_2Richard1433312551 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
The River Arun is tidal and therefore the moorings need to cater for the vast changes in river level. We enjoyed looking at the different constructions and choosing the best one. Claire also described how she would design and build a mooring so that Bobbie could easily climb onboard a boat.
4551_0korman1434572150 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: korman
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
Holly Tree Pub, Walberton
4551_1korman1434572150 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: korman
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
The Forge, Walburton
4551_2korman1434572150 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: korman
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
Route across Avisford Park Golf Club
4551_3korman1434572150 iFootpath - walking guides and directions for the UK Image by: korman
Uploaded: 01 Jan 1970
St Mary's Binstead

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