This site uses cookies please click 'Accept' to continue and remove this message or 'More....' to view our Privacy Policy

iFootpath uses first and third-party cookies to provide you with a personalised browsing experience. We do so in accordance with our Privacy Policy. By actively continuing to use this website, closing this banner or clicking the Accept button below, you consent to our use of cookies.

For full access to iFootpath, to view the GPS powered map, rate the walks, print, leave comments, mark walks as Favourite & Completed (mirror in the App), and much more please Register and login. It's free and only takes a moment or two. Already registered? Login here.

Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point

There are currently 0 comments and 6 photos online for this walk.

Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point
Author: Claire, Published: 12 Jun 2018 Walk Rating:star1 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guidestar1 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guidestar1 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guidestar0 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guidestar0 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide
County Durham, Seaham
Walk Type: Coastal
Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point
Length: 4 miles,  Difficulty: boot Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide boot Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide
iFootpath home page    Get the iFootpath iOS/apple app    Get the Android app from Google Play    Get the Android app from Amazon

0001_sunny Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking GuideToday's weather
8 °C, Clear/sunny, Wind: 8 mph SE
Next few days: Hover over icon for more info.
0002_sunny_intervals Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide 0003_white_cloud Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide 0003_white_cloud Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide 0001_sunny Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide 0001_sunny Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide

A 4 mile circular coastal walk close to the town of Seaham in County Durham. The walk begins just south of the town at Nose’s Point, once the site of a colliery but now a beautiful nature reserve, and takes in a beautiful stretch of the Durham Heritage Coast. You will enjoy a range of geological features including a couple of lovely beaches, flower-rich chalk grasslands, a chalk sea stack and a deep woodland gorge. Within the woodland gorge you will enjoy a fine view of an impressive viaduct and the remains of old lime kilns. There is plenty of wildlife to enjoy along the way including sea birds on the cliffs and deer, woodpeckers and tree creepers within the woodland.

The walk has several steady gradients throughout plus a couple of short steeper sections. If follows a mixture of cliff-edge paths (so take care with children and dogs), grass meadow paths and woodland paths. Some parts can become muddy and some narrow sections that can be a little overgrown. You will need to negotiate a couple of kissing gates and some flights of steps but there are no stiles or livestock on route. Dogs are welcome on the route and the beaches throughout the year. Allow 2 hours.

The walk starts and finishes at the free coastal car park at Nose’s Point, just south of the town of Seaham. The car park is accessed from the A182 and is marked with brown tourism signs. As you turn into the access drive, ignore the first parking area on the left, instead continue to the main car park at the end of the access drive. The nearest post code (which will take you to a nearby point on the A182) is SR7 7PS.

Walk Sections

Start to Jenny's Dene
Start to Jenny's Dene

Start point: 54.8236 lat, -1.3222 long
End point: 54.8212 lat, -1.3241 long

The walk begins from the main Nose’s Point large parking area. Although hard to believe today, this was the site of a colliery, Dawdon Pit, from 1907 to 1991. It was used to extract coal from under the sea and was one of the most productive pits in the country. Today it has been reclaimed by nature.

To begin, walk directly towards the sea through the pedestrian exit and then turn right to follow the tarmac coastal path, with the sea to your left. Pass a stone cairn and a couple of benches on your left and you will reach a subtle fork – take the left-hand grass branch of path, which passes a waste bin and upright sleeper information post on your left.

Follow this unmade path, passing several benches and with lovely views of Blast Beach to your left. The beach is named after the blast furnaces that were built on Nose’s Point in 1862. The grass path leads you back out to merge with a tarmac path, turn left to join this and almost immediately turn left to cross a drainage gully (known as Jenny’s Dene) via the footbridge. The narrow concrete chute was installed here to reduce incidents of flooding.

Jenny's Dene to Railway Bridge
Jenny's Dene to Railway Bridge

Start point: 54.8212 lat, -1.3241 long
End point: 54.8113 lat, -1.3176 long

Beyond the footbridge, keep ahead on the tarmac path which bears left and then swings right to pass an information board on your left. Follow the path leading you through a kissing gate (alongside a National Trust sign for Blast Beach) and then continuing with a wire fence and hedgerow on your right.

Continue until you reach a waymarker post on your left. Fork left here onto the grass path which is signed as part of the Heritage Coast Path. Simply stay on the grass coastal path as it meanders ahead, enjoying the flower-rich grass meadows on your right and the sea birds on your left. Part way along, the path heads inland again to cross over a set of steps – these lead down to Blast Beach should you wish to make a quick detour.

Stay on the coastal grass path and, as this draws level with the end of Blast Beach (which has an impressive free-standing sea stack), it bears left to follow the cliff edge around the headland known as Chourdon Point. On this headland you will find a waymarker post. It is worth pausing here to enjoy the fine views in both directions along the coast. Turn right at this waymarker post, leaving the coastal path and heading directly inland to reach a railway bridge.

Railway Bridge to Hawthorn Burn
Railway Bridge to Hawthorn Burn

Start point: 54.8113 lat, -1.3176 long
End point: 54.8064 lat, -1.3165 long

Cross over the railway bridge and immediately afterwards, turn left to follow the path with a wire fence running on your left. At the end of this path, take the kissing gate ahead and keep ahead on the narrow woodland path. Head down a handful of steps to reach a T-junction (with a stile onto the rail line on your left).

Turn right along the stone path for about 50 metres to reach the next waymarker post, marking a crossroads at the centre of the beautiful flower-filled Hawthorn Meadows. Turn left to follow the stone path and pass through the staggered barrier (an unusual arrangement made of a stone wall and semi-circular metal fence). Stay on the stone path leading you downhill through the woodland.

The path leads you down a long flight of steps and across the footbridge over Hawthorn Burn, the waterway at the bottom of this woodland gorge. On the middle of this bridge, pause and look high up to your left. You will see the beautiful arched brick viaduct which carries the coastal rail line over this deep woodland gorge.

Hawthorn Burn to Hawthorn Hive Beach
Hawthorn Burn to Hawthorn Hive Beach

Start point: 54.8064 lat, -1.3165 long
End point: 54.8062 lat, -1.3141 long

At the far side of the bridge, continue on the path which bends left and then turns right to head up a flight of steps. Part way up these steps, the path forks. Take the left-hand branch to emerge to a T-junction with a path. Turn left along the path, leading you under the viaduct.

Stay with the path as it winds steeply downhill and you will emerge out onto Hawthorn Hive Beach. On your right the path leads you past an intriguing arched structure set into the cliff. This is one of three lime kilns that were built into the cliff here, with restoration work completed in 2012. The lime produced was used for agriculture, building mortar and limewash for buildings. Take time to enjoy this secluded (and often deserted) beach should you wish (and if tide levels permit).

Hawthorn Hive Beach to Beacon Point
Hawthorn Hive Beach to Beacon Point

Start point: 54.8062 lat, -1.3141 long
End point: 54.8023 lat, -1.3133 long

When you have finished at the beach, retrace your steps to wind back up the tarmac and stone access path. Pass back under the viaduct to reach the top of the steps from which you emerged earlier. Go straight ahead at this point, ignoring the steps and following the path marked as part of the Heritage Coast Path.

At the T-junction, turn left and this path leads you under the furthest (and smallest) arch of the viaduct. The path swings right to continue as the coastal path with the rail line on your right and the grass-topped coastal cliffs on your left. It is now really up to you, how far you wish to walk before turning around to head back for the return leg. For our walk, we continued just to draw level with the large hillside on your right (Beacon Hill). This is a point on the coastal path known as Beacon Point and gives lovely views along the coast to the south.

Beacon Point to Meadows Crossroads
Beacon Point to Meadows Crossroads

Start point: 54.8023 lat, -1.3133 long
End point: 54.8077 lat, -1.3176 long

When you reach your chosen turning point, turn around and retrace your steps back along the coast path. Follow the path as it bends left under the viaduct and at the first waymarker post turn right. As you reach the top of the flight of steps, turn left to head down these. At the bottom, cross over the footbridge and continue up the steps at the far side.

Continue on the path, passing back through the unusual staggered barrier and on to reach the waymaker post at the crossroads in the centre of Hawthorn Meadows. Hawthorn meadows are an outstanding example of species rich calcareous grassland, with a rare base of magnesium limestone. In the summer months of June, July and August this area is awash with colour – look out for the purple flowers of the meadow cranesbill, common rockroses and several species of orchids amongst these beautiful grasslands. The meadows are cut just once per year for hay and are an important nesting site for skylarks.

An area to your right was once the site of Hawthorn Towers where the Pemberton family resided from 1836. It was demolished in 1969 but a few building stones from the Towers remain scattered around the area as a reminder of times past. The estate included tennis courts, gardens and orchards.

Meadows Crossroads to End
Meadows Crossroads to End

Start point: 54.8077 lat, -1.3176 long
End point: 54.8241 lat, -1.3223 long

Here we leave the path used for the outward leg, so go straight ahead (actually about 11 o’clock) on the path across the meadow. As you enter the trees at the edge of the meadows you will see a wide metal gate ahead. Pass through the gap alongside this and follow the grass track between sections of scrub.

You will emerge to a junction of tracks, with the entrance for the old Hawthorn Quarry across to your left. The quarry ceased working in 1985 and is now a site of national importance in the Geological Conservation Review. Planning permission was submitted to Durham County Council in December 2017 for mineral extraction work to begin at the quarry once again, but this has strong local opposition so time will tell if nature or human activity continue to govern this site.

Turn right here and follow the stone track which leads you back to the railway bridge. Cross the bridge and this time do NOT keep ahead towards the coast path. Instead, turn immediately left to continue on the stone path with the rail line fence running on your left. The path leads you all the way back to the kissing gate (that you passed through near the start of the walk).

Go through the gate and then take the right-hand branch at the path fork, leading you back over Jenny’s Dene. At the far side, take the left-hand (and higher) of the two tarmac paths. At the next path crossroads, turn right and this path will lead you directly back to the car park where the walk began.

Remember...the best way of following our walking guides is to use the iFootpath App (iOS and Android) where you will have all the information in the palm of your hand and see your exact location on the live map as you travel. You can also add comments, photos, ratings and track your own routes.

Check out these resources for your walk

hotels Hostel Directory GetMap Rail

network Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide Original GPX source file

Text and images for this walk are Copyright © 2018 by iFootpath and the author clairesharpuk and may not be reproduced without permission.


The information in this guide has been provided in good faith and is intended only as a guide, not a statement of fact. You are advised to check the accuracy of the information provided and should not use this guide for navigational directions nor should you rely on the accuracy of the weather forecast. You are advised to take appropriate clothing, footwear, equipment and navigational materials with you according to the current and possible weather and nature of the terrain. Always follow the country code and follow any additional warnings or instructions that may be available. Some walks may be very strenuous and you are advised to seek medical advice if you have any doubts as to your capability to complete the walk.

Powered by World Weather Online.

We've an App too

Did you know that we have an iFootopath App? - includes all walks with directions and a live map...

No need to print and no more wrong turns....

Get the iFootpath App

appstore  en badge web generic

Click top right X to close.

Instagram Photos for: "Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point"

To Post Instagram Photos Here for this Walk Please use #ifootpath10947


6 Gallery Images for: "Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point"

10947_0Richard1528814644 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 12 Jun 2018
Claire and Bobbie enjoying the coastal path
10947_1Richard1528814644 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 12 Jun 2018
Blast Beach with prominent sea stack.
10947_2Richard1528814644 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 12 Jun 2018
The viaduct high above you as you cross the bridge at Hawthorn Burn.
10947_3Richard1528814644 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 12 Jun 2018
Hawthorn Hive Beach
10947_0Richard1528899438 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 13 Jun 2018
Dawdon Colliery Remembered - Looking back towards Seaham Harbour, the Dawdon (pit pond) swimming pool can be clearly seen in the foreground
10947_1Richard1528899439 Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide Image by: Richard
Uploaded: 13 Jun 2018
Dawdon Colliery Remembered - Dawdon colliery as it was looking back from the "Blast" beach and Nose's Point

Share

 

Walks Nearby

Recently Added Walks.

Bolton Abbey and the River Wharfe, North YorkshireHartsop and Angletarn Pikes, CumbriaCinderbarrow and Yealand Storrs, LancashireBrindle and Hough Hill, LancashireGatton Park, North Downs and Banstead Heath, SurreyLoweswater and Holme Wood, CumbriaBurbage Edge and Hathersage Moor, DerbyshireLittle Marlow and Bloom Wood, BuckinghamshireBadbury Hill and D’Arcy Dalton Way, Oxfordshire

There are currently 1306 shared walks online. Add yours today!

Uncover an Elevation Chart for this Walk

Find out more by becoming an iFootpath Fan (Free for 40 Days).

 

Elevation_Chart Durham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point Walking Guide

What our customers say

We've an App too

Did you know that we have an iFootopath App? - includes all walks with directions and a live map...

No need to print and no more wrong turns....

Get the iFootpath App

appstore  en badge web generic

Click top right X to close.