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Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses

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Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses
Author: , Published: 26 Jul 2015 Walk Rating:star1 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide star1 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide star1 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide star1 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide star0 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide
Cambridgeshire, Newmarket
Walk Type: Footpaths and byways
Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses
Length: 6 miles,  Difficulty: boot Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide
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Stetchworth is 3 miles south of Newmarket and is surrounded by woodland, farmland and stud farms, whose paddocks form an oasis in the agricultural monoculture of East Anglia. While this is not an area of outstanding natural beauty, it does offer a quiet backwater with attractive countryside, a host of wildlife and plenty of horses. This circular walk encourages you to look for the wildlife (especially birds) that you may encounter along the route. Details of what to look for are included at the end of each section. It is possible (on a good day) to record 50 species of birds, 3 species of deer and foxes etc. In addition, badgers can be seen walking some of the same paths if you linger by the woodland sections at dusk. Both the Icknield Way Trail and Stour Valley Path pass through the village of Stetchworth and some sections of this walk follow the route of these long distance waymarked trails.

The route is generally easy, with footpaths that are usually well maintained. However, some short sections can get overgrown with bushes, thistles or brambles until they are cleared in late summer/autumn. In winter, the underlying bolder clay can become wet and sticky so stout footwear is required. The Stetchworth locale is at its best in April and May, when the paths dry out, the vegetation is short and the birds are all singing! The terrain is gently undulating with some gentle slopes that should not deter anyone of average fitness. There are five kissing gates, three of which are negotiated twice - there and back. One section follows a very quiet country lane, but those who want to avoid this can use a short cut that is mentioned in the route details. Dogs: All the Stud Farms along the route ask dog owners to keep dogs on a lead. In addition, you might encounter horses and riders along parts of the route so it is important that dogs are kept under close control. Ordnance Survey Maps: Explorer 210 (recommended), Landranger 154.

The walk starts at The Ellesmere Centre, where free parking is available. The address is Ley Road, Stetchworth, Newmarket, CB8 9TS.

By Bus: An infrequent bus service between Cambridge and Newmarket stops in the centre of Stetchworth, about 400 metres from the Ellesmere Centre.

By Train: The nearest train stations are at Dullingham (2 miles) and Newmarket (3½ miles) which are on the Cambridge to Ipswich line.

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Walk Sections

Start to Watery Lane
Start to Watery Lane

Start point: 52.1977 lat, 0.4016 long
End point: 52.1929 lat, 0.402 long

Walk through the car park at the Ellesmere Centre, away from the village. At the furthest point turn right, cross the road and pass through a wooden kissing gate between a large access gate and a tall hedge with many trees. The path through Aislabie Stud (formerly Collins Stud) will open up before you (illustrated) and follows the route of both the Icknield Way Trail and Stour Valley Path.

Continue, with a paddock on your left and a hedgerow with trees on your right, until you reach a junction in the track at the end of the paddock. This is a good vantage point to linger and listen for birds and to make friends with the mares and foals that often come to greet the walker. Please don't feed the horses and do remember that horses can bite!

Bear left at the junction and head down a gentle slope. At the bottom of the slope, you will pass through two kissing gates (NOTE: These are either side of an all weather race horse gallop so look both ways to ensure no fast moving horses are heading your way before crossing. Also be wary of the 4x4s that often follow the galloping horses).

Continue over a small wooden bridge on to the tree lined Watery Lane, waypoint 1.

Ground: In summer the walking is very easy along the grass covered paths that are kept in good order by the staff at the Stud. In winter the areas around the water troughs can get wet and muddy.

Look out for: The trees lining the road often have robins, finches, tits and thrushes. House martins and swallows nest in and around the stud buildings (opposite the Ellesmere Centre). The hedgerows have finches and warblers and in winter the paddocks can fill with gulls and winter thrushes. If you walk at first light on a winter's day you may see the spectacle of several thousand wood pigeons leaving their roosts in the local woods to feed in the surrounding fields! On rare occasions a little owl might be found standing on one of the paddock fences. Listen for woodpeckers, skylarks and yellowhammers. When the paddocks are not needed for horses they are often used for sheep, so in spring it is common to see new born lambs.

Watery Lane to Icknield Way
Watery Lane to Icknield Way

Start point: 52.1929 lat, 0.402 long
End point: 52.1884 lat, 0.4041 long

Cross Watery Lane and take the path ahead (just to your left), continuing through the fields beyond Watery Lane. (Illustration is looking back towards Watery Lane). This path is a continuation of the routes of the Icknield Way Trail and Stour Valley Path. On your left is an overgrown ditch and arable field, on your right is a field that has not had a crop for several years, making it a good place to find birds and butterflies. The locals often walk their dogs around the perimeter of this field.

Virtually all of the arable land around Stetchworth is owned by Stetchworth Estate Farms which, in turn, is owned by the Duke of Sutherland. It is managed in a sympathetic way for our wildlife, so there are large areas of set aside land, such as the field mentioned above.

Continue along the path until you reach the first woodland, Marmer's Wood. Bear right and continue along the edge of the field until you reach the far corner. Here you will find a small wooden bridge which crosses a ditch and enters a tree lined path that continues to your left.

After 120 metres you will find a junction with a path on your right which leads off through stud farm paddocks. The path to the right is the Icknield Way Trail which we DO NOT follow at this point, instead your route continues ahead along the route of the Stour Valley Path. However, before you proceed there is no harm in taking a peek to the right to see what may be in the paddocks. This is waypoint 2.

Ground: The path through the fields is pleasantly grassy - though this can grow long in summer. The woodland section is bare earth and can get wet and muddy in winter as it suffers from water draining off from the adjacent paddocks.

Look out for: The fields have reed buntings, skylarks, meadow pipits and kestrels, while the woodland has woodpeckers, nuthatches and warblers.

Icknield Way to Badger Sets
Icknield Way to Badger Sets

Start point: 52.1884 lat, 0.4041 long
End point: 52.1837 lat, 0.413 long

The route continues along the Stour Valley Path, lined with trees and bushes for the next mile. It has gentle up and down undulations, the first stage is a very gentle up slope. On the right you will pass a series of paddocks, on the left the landscape alternates between woodland and arable farm land.

After 100 metres, Marmer's Wood ends and the first arable field opens up on the left-hand side of the path, with another area left as set aside. Continue for another 0.25 mile, when another path joins from the right - again this path gives open views over the paddocks so is worth a peek. Shortly afterwards there is a path on the left which skirts around the next section of woodland - Basefield Wood. Do NOT take this left, instead continue for a further 0.25 mile with Basefield Wood on your left until you find a sudden kink in the path with a sharp right then left turn. This is waypoint 3.

Ground:The path is bare earth which is hard and dry in summer but can get wet and muddy in winter. Some of the bushes and brambles can grow across the path - but they are cleared every year so this is not usually a problem.

Look out for: As you walk this section you should see evidence of badger sets along the left-hand side of the path. Look for fresh activity. At the time of writing the newest excavations are at waypoint 3 and this makes it a good place to linger at dusk as this is when the badgers come out and can be seen walking along the footpath. The fields either side of the path can have herds of fallow deer which are very nervous when disturbed. If you are very observant you might see them hiding in the woods staring back at you. Waypoint 3 is also an excellent place to hear tawny owls as you wait for the Badgers to appear.

Badger Sets to Ten Wood
Badger Sets to Ten Wood

Start point: 52.1837 lat, 0.413 long
End point: 52.1766 lat, 0.4278 long

The route still continues along the Stour Valley Path, lined with trees and bushes. After about 50 metres you come to the end of Basefield Wood and the left hand side opens up to another section of arable farmland. After nearly 0.5 miles of gentle undulations, including a wooden bridge across a drainage ditch, you come to the end of the tree/bush lined section of the path. Initially the path opens out on the left with an arable field, some of which is again left as set aside. Shortly afterwards the right-hand side opens out to show another arable field.

Continue down a gentle slope until you reach a track just in front of the next wood, Ten Wood. Bear right and follow the path with the woods on your left until you reach the bottom of the slope. Here another path next to a ditch joins the Stour Valley Path. There is a wooden post with waymarkers here. This is waypoint 4.

Ground: Again the path is bare earth which is hard and dry in summer but can get wet and muddy in winter. Beware stumps of bushes left in the ground from previous path clearing operations - they are easy to trip over if you do not see them. Once the route opens out it becomes a grass covered path which is always easy to walk.

Look out for: Again herds of fallow deer can often be seen in the paddocks to the right of the path on the first part of this section. The arable fields are sometimes the site for the autumn rut of the fallow deer. The last part of the hedgerow on the right-hand side is a favourite location for lesser whitethroats. Hobbies often nest in Ten Wood and the occasional red kite can be seen over the arable fields, especially in spring.

Ten Wood to Brook Farm
Ten Wood to Brook Farm

Start point: 52.1766 lat, 0.4278 long
End point: 52.1748 lat, 0.4157 long

At waypoint 4 we leave the route of the Stour Valley Path. (Those of you with maps who want a longer walk can continue along the Stour Valley Path to Kirtling Weirs. Here you can turn right and make your way back to this route using the next waymarked footpath on the right. This will bring you out at the end of the country lane mentioned below.)

For the main route, at waypoint 4 turn right to follow the path with the overgrown ditch on your left. This passes between two arable fields until it reaches the next tree-lined hedgerow. Here you cross a small bridge and turn right to walk the path set into the hedgerow.

The path continues for another 0.25 mile with three left-hand bends until you emerge on to a country lane. This lane only serves a single stud farm and house (Brook Farm) so has very little traffic. You will find a passing place/layby (on your left) where you could park a car and use as an alternative starting point for the walk.

Turn right and walk along the lane down a gentle tree-lined slope until you reach the next bend. Here the lane turns sharp right but we will take the signposted footpath to the left. (NOTE: The signpost is partially hidden behind a tree!) This is waypoint 5.

Ground:The first part of this section is a grassy path where the grass can get a little long in summer. The second part along the hedgerow is bare earth which is hard when dry and muddy when wet in winter. Water can flow along the line of the path due to drainage ditches which no longer function. Near the road there is a small building on the left with a leaking over flow pipe which keeps this part of the path wet and muddy all the time. In winter it usually floods so wellies or boots are required!

Look out for: The grassy paths are good for butterflies while tawny owls sometimes roost in the hedgerow. It is common to see swifts and swallows here.

Brook Farm to Burrough Green
Brook Farm to Burrough Green

Start point: 52.1748 lat, 0.4157 long
End point: 52.1748 lat, 0.3949 long

At waypoint 5, turn left off the country lane onto a footpath that skirts around the edge of a paddock on your left-hand side. The path bears left around the edge of the field and soon you join a hedge and a small stream on your right-hand side.

Very soon the path turns right through a gap in the hedge, across a metal footbridge (which spans the stream) and heads out across the middle of an arable field, part of Wyck Farm. The path heads up a gentle but featureless hill and out of sight. Fortunately the farmer always makes the route of the path clear to see (except when just ploughed!). Walk a straight line up the hill and across the field until you eventually reach an area of woodland on the far side. As you reach the top of the slope it is worth turning round to look at the panorama. As you approach the edge of the field you can normally see an ornamental lake to your right (when it is not hidden by vegetation).

On reaching the edge of the field, follow the footpath waymarkers which indicate that you should turn sharp left and walk around the edge of the field, with the field on your left and woods on your right. The path turns right as you walk along and on reaching the end of the woods you will find an area where the farmer dumps unwanted equipment which is left to rust away.

Continue around the edge of the field bearing left as you do so. You will shortly reach a little group of trees (on your left) where a footpath waymarker directs you to turn right across another smaller field. Again the route of the path is usually obvious, and ends by some large oak trees, to the right of the farm buildings.

Continue around the edge of the field with the field on your right. The path soon turns sharp right at the corner of the field. Here you will find some of the houses of the village of Burrough Green appearing on your left-hand side. The exit to the field is just beyond a small pond, which often dries up in summer, through a gap in the hedgerow. Beyond the hedgerow we meet another footpath which crosses our route. This is waypoint 6.

Ground:The first part of this section gets overgrown with thistles in summer. The path across the open field is often bare earth which gets very muddy in winter. (Pick a day when the ground is frozen hard!) In summer, the arable field is used to grow fodder for beef cattle which are kept in open barns that can be seen on your left as you reach the top of the slope. The crops include: grass, grain and maze. The latter can grow very tall and completely obscure any view - but the route of the path is easy to walk.

Look out for: The arable field is surprisingly good for birds, especially in winter. Flocks of lapwing and golden plover often winter here. This is also one of the best places to see buzzard (they can be seen almost anywhere along the route). The wintering birds occasionally attract other birds of prey such as merlin and peregrine falcon. In summer, the afore mentioned area where old equipment is left to rust is a favourite for blackcaps, robins and wrens. Untidy farms are often good for wildlife. The ornamental pond has duck, little grebes, herons and occasional geese and swans. Wyck Farm also has a small irrigation reservoir (not on this route) that attracts migrant waders in autumn so look out for snipe, redshank, greenshank, green and common sandpipers any of which could be seen or heard calling as they fly over.

Burrough Green to Dullingham Ley
Burrough Green to Dullingham Ley

Start point: 52.1748 lat, 0.3949 long
End point: 52.1831 lat, 0.3996 long

At waypoint 6, a wooden signpost on your left-hand side indicates the direction of your footpath which crosses the corner of an arable field before following the border between the gardens of Burrough Green properties and the open fields. You will pass a footpath on your left which heads to the centre of the village (should you wish to make a small detour) where a very small village green is used as a cricket pitch by the local team! Next to this path is the village public house - you can sit out at the front and enjoy watching a game of village cricket!

We will stay on the Icknield Way Trail until the next waypoint. The Icknield Way Trail continues between fences and hedgerows for a short distance before suddenly opening out to cross between two paddocks. The path is enclosed between stock fencing with kissing gates at each end. Part of the large paddock on the right is sometimes used for schooling show jumping horses.

Beyond the paddocks you reach a track with a row of cottages on your right-hand side, Gypsy Hall. Follow the track as it passes the cottages and on to a tree-lined section. This continues for 650 metres, until you reach a country lane, the same as the one we met earlier. This is waypoint 7.

Ground: The first stretch of arable field is short but is again prone to being muddy in winter. The rest of the path through to Gypsy Hall is always easy to walk. The track from Gypsy Hall to waypoint 7 has had recent work to clear it and deal with muddy sections in order to allow stud farm vehicles access to the paddocks so is now easy to walk, but beware the occasional vehicle.

Look out for: Burrough Green seems to have a surfeit of collared doves and the village green collects a lot of pied wagtails with the odd yellow wagtail in late summer. The hedgerows along the track are good for warblers, robins and thrushes. The track is also lined with evidence of badger sets and so provides another location where an evening stroll gives a chance to see badgers.

Dullingham Ley to Otter Pond
Dullingham Ley to Otter Pond

Start point: 52.1831 lat, 0.3996 long
End point: 52.1882 lat, 0.3942 long

Here you have two alternative routes. The one described in this route continues to the left along the country lane.

(The alternative, for those who prefer to avoid this, continues on The Icknield way Trail: cross the lane and follow a footpath around the left edge of a paddock. The route of this path is obvious and after nearly 0.5 mile brings you back to waypoint 2, from where you can retrace your steps to the Ellesmere Centre.)

For the main route: by turning left on to the country lane you are following the Riders Route of the Icknield Way Trail. This country lane has little traffic. You pass a few houses and then down a gentle slope in a tree-lined section. At the bottom of the slope the lane turns right then left and heads up a gentle slope with a paddock on the left and a hedgerow on the right.

After 300 metres look out for a gap in the hedgerow on the right-hand side that gives views of Horseheath Pond beyond a paddock (illustrated) - always worth a look as you may be lucky to see an otter. This is waypoint 8.

Ground: The country lane undulates gently and is easy walking - though it sometimes gets icy in winter. The alternative route via the Icknield Way Trail can get overgrown. Take particular care around the first paddock where tall nettles have a tendency to hide rabbit holes.

Look out for: The first few hundred metres of the country lane is an area where a some of the rabbits are golden brown in colour. Horseheath Pond is one of the few places where an otter may be seen. Sightings are rare but an otter is seen fishing here from time to time, especially in autumn.

Otter Pond to Choice of Paths
Otter Pond to Choice of Paths

Start point: 52.1882 lat, 0.3942 long
End point: 52.1929 lat, 0.3986 long

Continue along the country lane (Icknield Way Trail Riders Route) for 600 metres. Shortly after leaving Horseheath Pond the lane passes Hope Hall Stables on the left, then passes a series of paddocks on both sides of the lane and then through the hamlet of Cross Green, which consists of 8 houses. You reach a bridleway sign directing you to the right, just before the 8th house.

Turn right onto this bridleway which follows the line of Watery Lane with a small stream on your left (which dries up in summer). Walk past the house and its gardens on your left. After 300 metres you will reach a footpath waymarker on the right-hand side of the bridleway. This is waypoint 9.

Ground: The country lane has gentle undulations and is easy to walk. Watery Lane is a wide bridleway with bare earth and can get muddy in winter.

Look out for: Hope Hall Stables have nesting swallows and house martins. The houses of Cross Green are good for a variety of typical garden birds. Watery Lane has warblers, tits and finches.

Choice of Paths to End
Choice of Paths to End

Start point: 52.1929 lat, 0.3986 long
End point: 52.1977 lat, 0.4016 long

From Way Point 9 you have a choice:
Option 1: Continue along Watery Lane (bridleway) for 250 metres where you will find yourself back at waypoint 1.
Option2: Turn left over a wooden footbridge and then turn right on to a public footpath which runs parallel to the bridleway and alongside the all weather race horse gallop you crossed just before waypoint 1. This will return you to the kissing gates next to Waypoint 1.

On reaching waypoint 1 you can retrace your steps back to the Ellesmere Centre, where the walk began.

Ground: Watery Lane is mostly bare earth which can get wet and muddy in winter - but recent work has improved the worst stretches. The footpath is grassy and easy to walk but can get overgrown before it is cleared in summer. Since this path runs parallel to the gallop, dogs must be kept on a lead.

Look out for: Watery Lane is good for warblers, tits and finches. The footpath is good for winter gulls and thrushes and also galloping race horses!

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Text and images for this walk are Copyright © 2015 by the author jadehorizon and may not be reproduced without permission.


The information in this guide has been provided in good faith and is intended only as a guide, not a statement of fact. You are advised to check the accuracy of the information provided and should not use this guide for navigational directions nor should you rely on the accuracy of the weather forecast. You are advised to take appropriate clothing, footwear, equipment and navigational materials with you according to the current and possible weather and nature of the terrain. Always follow the country code and follow any additional warnings or instructions that may be available. Some walks may be very strenuous and you are advised to seek medical advice if you have any doubts as to your capability to complete the walk.

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34 gallery images for "Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses"

4745_0jadehorizon1437136757 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 17 Jul 2015
Ellesmere Centre
4745_0jadehorizon1437142179 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 17 Jul 2015
All weather Race Horse Gallup by Way Point 1
4745_0jadehorizon1437741541 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 1 Kissing Gate near Ellesmere Centre
4745_0jadehorizon1437742022 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 1 The path through Aislabie Stud.
4745_1jadehorizon1437742022 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 1 Aislabie Stud - the locals are usually friendly.
4745_2jadehorizon1437742022 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 1 Looking towards Watery Lane with Marmer's Wood in the distance
4745_0jadehorizon1437742500 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section1 Aislabie Stud - All weather race horse gallop.
4745_1jadehorizon1437742500 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 1 Footbridge gives access to Watery Lane and Way Point 1
4745_0jadehorizon1437742912 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 1 Watery Lane
4745_1jadehorizon1437742913 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 2 The path continues towards Marmer's Wood
4745_0jadehorizon1437743460 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 2 The path skirts around Marmer's Wood.
4745_1jadehorizon1437743460 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 2 Marmer's Wood - The Stour Valley Path continues ahead while the Icknield Way Trail leaves to the right.
4745_0jadehorizon1437744035 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 2 The Stour Valley Path continues.
4745_1jadehorizon1437744035 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 2 - a kink in the path!
4745_2jadehorizon1437744035 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 2 - Badger set in current use.
4745_0jadehorizon1437744572 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 3 Arable fields beyond Basefield Wood
4745_1jadehorizon1437744572 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 3 herd of Fallow Deer in paddock.
4745_0jadehorizon1437747008 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 4 The path opens out with Ten Wood ahead.
4745_1jadehorizon1437747008 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 4 Keep to the right on reaching Ten Wood - most walkers use this gap in the trees.
4745_2jadehorizon1437747008 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 4 The path passes to the right of Ten Wood with Way Point 4 at the bottom of the slope.
4745_0jadehorizon1437747348 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 5 Muddy patch created by leaking overflow pipe (for over 20 years!) on stud farm building. This can flood in winter.
4745_0jadehorizon1437747510 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 5 Country Lane
4745_1jadehorizon1437747510 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 5
4745_0jadehorizon1437748243 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 6 Gentle climb through the arable fields of Wyck Farm.
4745_1jadehorizon1437748243 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 6 Looking back from the top of the rise.
4745_2jadehorizon1437748243 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 6 Way marker (by the trees) directing you through the next field.
4745_3jadehorizon1437748243 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 6 - follow the footpath sign.
4745_0jadehorizon1437748797 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 7 Behind the gardens of Burrough Green
4745_1jadehorizon1437748797 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 7 - the path through paddocks to Gypsy Hall (a row of cottages!)
4745_2jadehorizon1437748798 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 7 The Track beyond Gypsy Hall.
4745_0jadehorizon1437749451 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 7
4745_1jadehorizon1437749451 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 8 - look out for a gap in the hedge on the right hand side, for views over Horseheath Pond and may be a rare chance to see Otters.
4745_0jadehorizon1437750031 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Section 9 - Country Lane meets Watery Lane - turn right at the footpath sign.
4745_1jadehorizon1437750031 Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide Image by: jadehorizon
Uploaded: 24 Jul 2015
Way Point 9 - Either continue along Watery Lane or turn left then right to walk the parallel footpath

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Lympne: Roman Remains and African Plains, KentBoston Town Heritage Trail, LincolnshireHam Street Woods Circuit, KentWye and the North Downs, KentMillennium Way: Claydon and Upper Boddington, OxfordshireMillennium Way: Burton Green and Beechwood, WarwickshireMillennium Way: Coughton and Alcester, WarwickshireEbernoe Common and Balls Cross, West SussexGrosmont and Beck Hole Circular, North Yorkshire

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