This site uses cookies please click 'Accept' to continue and remove this message or 'More....' to view our Privacy Policy

iFootpath uses first and third-party cookies to provide you with a personalised browsing experience. We do so in accordance with our Privacy Policy. By actively continuing to use this website, closing this banner or clicking the Accept button below, you consent to our use of cookies.

For full access to iFootpath, to join the walking community, rate the walks, print, leave comments, mark walks as Favourite & Completed (mirror in the App), and much more please Register and login. It's free (no subscription, no charge to view or download a walking guide or GPS route) and only takes a moment or two. Already registered? Login here.

Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway

There are currently 0 comments and 0 photos online for this walk.

Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway
Author: Claire, Published: 02 May 2017 Walk Rating:star1 Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide star1 Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide star1 Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide star1 Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide star0 Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide
North Yorkshire, North York Moors
Walk Type: Hills, valleys and dales
Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway
Length: 4 miles,  Difficulty: boot Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide
iFootpath home page    Get the iFootpath iOS/apple app    Get the Android app from Google Play    Get the Android app from Amazon

0001_sunny Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide Today's weather
10 °C, Clear/sunny, Wind: 2 mph NNE
Next few days: Hover over icon for more info.
0006_mist Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide 0002_sunny_intervals Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide 0001_sunny Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide 0002_sunny_intervals Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide 0001_sunny Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide

A 4 mile easy-access ‘there and back’ walk, close to Rosedale Abbey in the centre of the North York Moors. The walking route follows the line of a dismantled railway which once transported coal and iron ore, playing a key role in industrial Yorkshire. Today, the remaining track bed offers unrivalled access into the centre of the moors, with outstanding valley views for the entire length. If you fancy getting out into the wilderness, without any worries about navigation or terrain, then this walk is ideal for you.

The route follows a compacted stone path for its entire length with no significant gradients. The path is high and exposed so make sure you have appropriate clothing. Being a ‘there and back’ walk, it can be shortened to suit your own ability and, as the terrain and views are consistent throughout, you won’t be missing out by taking a shorter option. There are no gates, stiles, steps or other obstacles on route so the walk is ideal for rugged pushchairs or disability buggies. Dogs are welcome on this permissive path, but they need to be on leads as there are sheep and ground nesting birds on the surrounding moorland. Allow 2 hours.

The walk starts and finishes at the free Bank Top car park on Rosedale Chimney Bank, just south of Rosedale Abbey in the centre of the North York Moors. Leave the A170 just east of Kirkbymoorside, following signs for Hutton-le-Hole and Ryedale Folk Museum. At the northern end of Hutton-le-Hole, turn right (signed to Lastingham) and, just after crossing the cattle grid, fork left (signed to Rosedale Bank Top). Follow this lane (Rosedale Chimney Bank) across the moor for 3 miles to reach the top of the bank. Ignore the first car park on the left and, 150 metres later, park in the second car park on the left (on the bend in the road). The nearest post code is YO18 8SE, but this will take you too far north along Rosedale Chimney Bank (into the edge of the village).

View Larger Map

Walk Sections

Start to Merging Tracks
Start to Merging Tracks

Start point: 54.3435 lat, -0.8913 long
End point: 54.347 lat, -0.8951 long

From the car park, join the compacted stone path which starts immediately to the right of the small information board. Remember, you are sharing these open moors with sheep and ground-nesting birds so please keep dogs on a lead. Follow this path winding gently uphill to pass the tall stone arches of the former industrial kilns on your left.

It is hard to imagine anything other than the peaceful moorland here, but from 1855 to 1926 Rosedale rang with the sound of the Victorian industrial age. Ironstone mines were opened on the moors and the arches you see here were two of the roasting kilns. The mined iron ore was tipped into the top of these kilns then roasted with coal to reduce its weight and impurities. A huge workforce was needed and the population of the dale shot up from 558 people to 2,839 in a mere 20 years.

Beyond the kiln arches, continue ahead on the surfaced path with beautiful views across to the valley to your right and moorland all around you. Further along, after passing a small group of houses down to your right, your path merges with a stone track.

Merging Tracks to Sculptural Seat
Merging Tracks to Sculptural Seat

Start point: 54.347 lat, -0.8951 long
End point: 54.3487 lat, -0.9022 long

Go straight ahead towards a vehicle barrier, and pass through the generous gap to the right of this. Follow the wide stone track ahead. This wide stone track has not been built for walkers (although it does suit this need perfectly!). In fact, it is the line of a former railway that served as part of the industrial past. Built in the 1860s, the railway ran over the moors for 14 miles, from Bank Top to Great Ayton. It was a very impressive engineering feat and was used to transport the processed iron ore out of the valley and to import the coal for use in the kilns.

Down in the valley bottom to your right, you will be able to see the village of Rosedale Abbey. Don’t expect to see an abbey though; the village is on the site of a former Cistercian priory which was pulled down in the 1800s.

Further along you will reach a sculptural bench on your right, called Set in Stone, with two planks carefully set into a carved boulder. There is a poem inscribed into the edges of the planks and images carved into the boulder. The sculptor, Vivien Mousdell, worked with the children of Rosedale Abbey primary school to come up with the words and images, that reflect the ironstone mining heritage of the area.

In the dark, working hard, loading up the wooden cart,
Work-shift over, in the sun, on the hill, having fun.

Sculptural Seat to Turning Point
Sculptural Seat to Turning Point

Start point: 54.3487 lat, -0.9022 long
End point: 54.3568 lat, -0.9276 long

If you wish to follow a shorter version of this walk (a total of 2km or 1.2 miles), then now is the time to turn around and head back. Otherwise, continue ahead along the stone track former railway (of course you can turn back at any point).

Stay with the stone track swinging steadily left, gradually leading you away from the valley. Later, the track begins to bear right again. If you look down to your right, you may be able to see a line of black shelters running down the hillside, used as part of the grouse shooting industry. The moorland is an important habitat for sheep, reptiles and a number of birds including grouse, lapwings, curlew and golden plover.

Follow the track along this long sweeping right-hand bend, ahead for a stretch and then beginning to swing left. Here you will see the remains of a stone building on your left and, just after this, a wire fence enclosure. This is the site of Sheriff’s Pit, one of the former mines. This pit closed in 1911, but the shaft is still open and surrounded by fencing for safety, with the rush of water often audible as it runs through the mine. The stone wall remnants alongside are all that remain of the mine manager’s house.

Turning Point to End
Turning Point to End

Start point: 54.3568 lat, -0.9276 long
End point: 54.3437 lat, -0.8913 long

From this point, it is simply a case of re-tracing your steps back along the outward path. Turn around and head back along the stone track which leads you past the sculptural seat to reach the vehicle barrier.

NOTE: This next bit needs care to ensure you don’t accidentally go the wrong way! You will see two stone tracks ahead and, if you look carefully, a narrower stone path that runs in between them. It is this narrower stone path that you need to follow; it runs parallel to the right-hand track to begin with and then bears left (passing the terraced cottages down to your left). The path leads you back past the roasting kilns to reach the car park where the walk began.

Remember...the best way of following our walking guides is to use the iFootpath App (iOS and Android) where you will have all the information in the palm of your hand and see your exact location on the live map as you travel. You can also add comments, photos, ratings and track your own routes.

Check out these resources for your walk

hotels Hostel Directory GetMap Rail

network Bank Top and Rosedale Mineral Railway Walking Guide Original GPX source file

Text and images for this walk are Copyright © 2017 by the author clairesharpuk and may not be reproduced without permission.


The information in this guide has been provided in good faith and is intended only as a guide, not a statement of fact. You are advised to check the accuracy of the information provided and should not use this guide for navigational directions nor should you rely on the accuracy of the weather forecast. You are advised to take appropriate clothing, footwear, equipment and navigational materials with you according to the current and possible weather and nature of the terrain. Always follow the country code and follow any additional warnings or instructions that may be available. Some walks may be very strenuous and you are advised to seek medical advice if you have any doubts as to your capability to complete the walk.

Powered by World Weather Online.

We've an App too

Did you know that we have an iFootopath App? - includes all walks with directions and a live map...

No need to print and no more wrong turns....

Get the iFootpath App

appstore  en badge web generic

Click top right X to close.

Share

 

Walks Nearby

Recently Added Walks.

Henley, Binfield Heath and Sonning, OxfordshireThe Cherry Tree Inn’s Woodland and Well Trail, OxfordshireThe Royal Oak, East Lavant and St Roche’s Hill, West SussexThursley’s Dragonflies and the Atlantic Wall, SurreyDurham Heritage Coast: Seaham and Beacon Point, County DurhamSouth Tyne Rail Trail: Alston and Kirkhaugh, CumbriaChichester Harbour and Canal, West SussexHamsterley Forest Three Becks Trail, County DurhamBinfield and Billingbear, Berkshire

There are currently 1229 shared walks online. Add yours today!

What our customers say

We've an App too

Did you know that we have an iFootopath App? - includes all walks with directions and a live map...

No need to print and no more wrong turns....

Get the iFootpath App

appstore  en badge web generic

Click top right X to close.