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Celebrate National Tree Week

As National Tree Week – which runs from 26 November to 4 December 2016 – approaches, The Tree Council is encouraging everyone to consider how they can change views for the better by planting and celebrating trees. First mounted in 1975, National Tree Week is the UK's largest tree celebration and launches the start of the winter tree planting season.


tree week posterAcross the country, views of the landscape are changing as more and more trees fall victim to invasive pests and diseases. National Tree Week provides communities with the impetus to fight back by planting the trees of the future, celebrating local woodlands and attempting to change the view for future generations.

tree council treeEach year, the festival inspires around a quarter of a million people to get their hands dirty and plant up to one million trees. This year is no exception, and fun, worthwhile and accessible tree planting events are taking place around the country, organised by The Tree Council’s member organisations, which include voluntary bodies and local authorities, as well as the network of 8,000 Tree Warden volunteers, schools, community groups and others. You can find out about the events taking place on the Tree Council’s interactive Near You map.

National Tree Week has an added resonance this year as 2016 is the 300th anniversary of the birth of Lancelot Capability Brown, the famous landscape architect who transformed views from so many of our best loved country estates, parks and gardens. He was nicknamed Capability due to his tendency to tell his clients that they had ‘great capability’ to improve the landscape. Few of us have large country estates at our disposal, but we each have the capability to change views by helping to plant more trees.

Why not get out and appreciate the beauty of trees with an iFootpath woodland walk or an iFootpath Capability Brown parkland walk?

treedressingFor those who don't have the opportunity to plant a tree, there are plenty of other ways to get involved in National Tree Week. People can celebrate trees by contributing a tree story or memory towards the Charter for Trees, Woods and People, which launches in a year's time in November 2017.

Or communities could dress a favourite local tree during Tree Dressing Day (3rd December 2016), which falls on the last weekend of National Tree Week. There are lots of different types of dressing, such as yarn-bombing, lantern hanging, or simply hanging decorations made by members of the community. Often these activities include other elements such as story-telling and bonfires.

Further information about National Tree Week can be found on the Tree Council website.

21 November 2016

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The length of our walking guides is given in miles and rounded to the nearest full mile (whole number) for simplicity. For short walks (of less than 2 miles) or walks that have a length that ends in .5, a more accurate walk length may be given in the first section of the walk introduction. For example, the Length in the header may be listed as 6 miles, and the introduction may confirm that the exact length of the walk is 5.5 miles. The walk length is calculated from the GPS file that was created by the walk author GPS tracking the walk whilst walking, using the iFootpath App GPS Tracker, meaning it is very accurate. Our bespoke tracker is particularly detailed and plots a walkers position about every 10 seconds. The tracker is calibrated to match two other reputable map and walking sources, Ordnance Survey and Nike. As with all standardised walk and map lengths, the distance does not take account of hills and slopes, just the distance you would measure using a piece of string on a flat map version of the terrain, so hilly walks will feel longer than stated. If you track the route using another GPS App or Tracker App or Fitness Device, you can expect the distance you record to be different due to different calibrations. This is particularly true of those Apps and devices that count your motion and steps – these can only guess the distance you have travelled with each step and so are much less accurate.

Grade (Boots)

The grade of a walk is an indicator of how difficult the terrain is that you will encounter along the way. This does not take into account the walk length but does suggest how challenging the walk will be. It takes into account things like hills, path surfaces and obstacles (like stiles, gates, steps and rock scrambles). An easy walk, graded as 1 (and shown as 1 Boot) indicates a walk that is essentially flat, has no sharp hills to climb, has no stiles, is easy to navigate (probably along a well-worn path) and is suitable for most levels of fitness. A difficult walk, graded as 5 (and represented by 5 Boots) indicates a walk that is strenuous and involves steep ascents and/or descents. It may be technically challenging involving difficult terrain or obstacles that require scrambling with your hands. Please note that the grading for walks is subjective and open to interpretation and should only be used as a guide when selecting a walk.

NOTE: Do be aware that the level of stamina required for any walk will vary depending on both the walk length and the difficulty grade - you should only walk within your limits.

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